Savage Gulf: Stone Door/Ranger Falls/Alum Gap/Big Creek Rim Trails

Tennessee Hikes

This past weekend I decided on a sort of ‘training hike’ at Savage Gulf State Natural Area. I am planning on doing the whole Georgia section of the Appalachian Trail in May so I am in training mode. I did around ten miles starting at Stone Door with the intention of going to Ranger Falls, Up to Alum Gap campsites and then, if time permitted, was going to go to Greeter Falls and then return to Stone Door via the Big Creek Rim trail.

I have hiked all over Savage Gulf and this is one of the few sections I have left to hike. I had been to the base of Stone Door before…stopping just above the wooden stairs at the bottom. On this day I would continue on down those steps going all the way down to the gulf.

It was a beautiful hike. The temps were right above freezing when we finally hit the trail. When we got to Stone Door we found an icy mess of the stone steps that led down to the bottom.

My friend, Brenda, was able to walk down. No way was I going to chance messing up my knee again. I scooted all the way down on my booty. It was quite cold when I stood up, as you can imagine. However, I knew it would be warming up and it wasn’t all that uncomfortable.

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This is a rugged trail. There are tons of boulders and rocks. You have to watch your footing and you will not be moving fast on this section.

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The main trail is blazed in white and the Ranger Falls spur trail is blazed in blue. The trail is well marked.

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It is rocky going the whole way which makes for a very slow hike. We have had a lot of rain over the last few weeks. I mean A LOT of rain. The Cumberland River was at or just below flood stage. There were little wet weather waterfalls that had popped up all along the way and the normally dry creek bed that was part of the trail now had water flowing through it.

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Most of the hike at the base goes along the river. There was a small section that cut back up for a bit, but it headed back down.

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Turn off to the left and follow the trail. The view of Big Creek is beautiful. At least is was on this day. It became very apparent that there was more flooding than I had anticipated.

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As we walked up to the blazed tree we were so disappointed.

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There was absolutely no way we could get across.

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Even though it was a HUGE disappointment, especially after the hike in and what would be a brutal hike out, the day and the area had been so pretty we were just thankful to be out and about. We knew we would be coming back.  This spot was so nice we decided to eat lunch and get off trail a little and explore. There was a little sandy beach area and plenty of rocks to sit on and be comfortable.

We finished up lunch and we really weren’t expecting the hike out to be any more picturesque than what we had already seen. We were wrong. A little ways back down the main trail we came upon a waterfall. Not Ranger falls, but what we guessed was a wet weather waterfall. I have not been in this section before, so I have no idea if this is normally there. It was beautiful.

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I don’t know if camping is allowed on this stretch, but if I could choose a spot it would be right down on the little beach area where this was. There was a larger area with some sand.

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Could have stayed all day, but we had to get moving. We knew the hike up to the Alum Gap campsites was going to be hard. We just weren’t ready for how hard. Usually, here in Tennessee, there are a lot of switchbacks. However, not the case on the way back up. It was straight up and unrelenting. I am not sure what the grade of the trail is, but I know it was definitely doing a number on my ankles. They were killing me as was my back and shoulders.

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After what feels like a week you will come to some steps (sort of).

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Here’s a view looking back down

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This is how pathetic I am on hills. As we were climbing up we could hear some people coming up behind us. We got to the top and decided to just wait and catch our breath. Along comes a group of older people. I mean late sixties. There was one young guy pulling up the rear and sort of helping an older gentleman. I think he may have been his grandfather. The kid looked to be maybe 19 or 20. They get to the top with us and we chat for a minute and go on while they stay back and rest. It wasn’t ten minutes before every.single.one of them passed us…or, should I say, me. Brenda is only slow because of me. I accepted a long time ago that pretty much if you are breathing you will be faster than I am. Those older folks smoked us. They were up and gone in no time. Never saw them again. And they were going where we were….back to Stone Door.

This massive climb took us right around an hour to do. As hard as I try, I just cannot do hills fast.

There were still some surprises in store as we got closer to the top top lol.

There was another waterfall.

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I was too exhausted and hyperventilating from the climb, that I did not have the energy to try and do a proper waterfall picture. So this will have to do.

Finally, after a week on that hill,  we were at the junction.

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The plan to go to Greeter was now a distant memory. That would add another 2.8 miles and we just didn’t have the energy or the daylight left to do it. I have been to Greeter many times. It it will have to wait for the next time.

So on towards Alum Gap Campsites we went. I wanted to show Brenda the sites because I plan on a camping trip sometime this year with her and Shelia.

As we got to the kiosk there was a sign I had never seen before:

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I have yet to ever see a bear in Savage Gulf, but I do know they are there.  Not worried one bit. I solo camped in the area last year with only one small group of other people at a distant site, and didn’t have any problems. I know it could happen, but I’m certainly not letting that stop me from hiking or camping.

There were several workers there fixing up all the sites and dropping dead trees. By spring the camping areas are going to be in great shape.

I already spotted the site I want to use next time. Site #8.

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After checking all the sites out we had a decision to make. We could take the shorter, Laurel Trail  (2.9 miles)back to to Stone door or the longer Big Creek Rim Trail (3.2 miles). The difference is the Laurel trail is pretty much all in the woods while the BCR trail goes in and out of the woods with several overlook views. We opted to do the Rim trail.

We were so tired, but the views were worth it.

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There weren’t any colors on the trees and very little green, but I still thought it was pretty.

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And to think we had been right down in the middle of that just a few hours before.

We made it back to Stone door and popped out right near the overlooks on that side again. Now for the mile or so hike back to my car. We were exhausted, but felt accomplished.

Here is my Alltrails recording of the trip.

As per our usual stop when we hike in Savage Gulf , our post hike meal would be Jim Oliver’s Smokehouse in Monteagle, TN. Oh.My.Word. I always describe it as Cracker Barrel’s redneck cousin. They have the best food and very unique general store. Check it out if you are ever out that way.

Happy Hiking!

Tennessee Hikes

My First Solo Camping Trip

I had planned this forever. And every time the day would come a bad storm would be in the forecast. I have just about decided it’s better to just go on the fly rather than ‘plan’ a camping trip. And, as in every other time, I planned and then a storm changed my plans.

I had decided I would do a two night/three day hiking trip back up to the Grayson Highlands. I would camp two nights in the Mt. Rogers area (remember, no camping in Grayson Highlands State Park).  When I first decided on this I told no one; not even my husband. About a week prior I finally told him and my nephew. I anxiously watched the weather every day and, sure enough, the rain chances increased daily. I decided that if it got up to a better than 50% chance of rain I would try to do something different. While I have hiked/camped in the rain several times with friends, I had no desire to hike alone in what would probably end up being a pretty foggy, dreary hike.

So, now what? I decided on a camping spot I had been to on two previous camp-outs with friends.  Savage Gulf it was and on to the Alum Gap campsites I went.  The rain was still in the forecast. Actually, really bad storms were in the forecast. However, I was so familiar and at ease with the area I just figured to heck with it and just decided I HAD to do this.

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It is a relatively easy 2.9 mile hike in on the Laurel Trail and had rained some just prior to getting on trail so it was pretty muddy in spots. If it had not been around 300% humidity it would have been a pleasant hike. As it was, it was quite buggy and, by the time I got to camp, I was completely drenched. I looked like I had been hiking in the rain for hours.

The camping spots are huge and spaced out nicely. This makes for an excellent beginner camping trip. There are plenty of trees for hammocks..which is what I use and the tent spots are mostly level. Why would you want to tent? I still don’t understand it.

I arrived at campsite #7. Everything was soaking wet so I knew there would be no campfire. I was a little bummed about that, but on the upside I didn’t have to mess with cutting up any wood. I had left my stool at home and I really don’t care to sit on the ground if I can help it. I decided to just go ahead and start setting up my rig so I would have a place to sit and eat dinner.

Up She went. I have a Grand Trunk double hammock that I absolutely love. I recently bought an Eno Junglenest single hammock with built in bug net. It was too tight for me. I am so used to all the extra space in the double that I gave the Eno to my husband.

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The bug net is a Live Infinitely that I got on Amazon for $25 bucks! I LOVE it! It is so easy to set up. It’s easy to get in and out of. The zipper had two pulls that go all the way up and down. I store my hiking shoes in the bottom of it, along with other odds and ends.

Next up is the tarp. I have the ENO Housefly tarp with doors. I cannot say enough good things about this tarp. If you choose to put it in storm mode it really cinches down nicely and gives you, not only protection, but also privacy. For this trip I kept it in porch mode the whole time for maximum airflow. I did angle one corner down when the rain started so it would run off. There was no wind whatsoever, so no need to go full storm mode.

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Excuse the mess. My poor backpack. She’s filthy. The two blue things are a cheap Wal-Mart sleep pad that I cut in half to make sit pads. They work wonderfully and come in handy for other things. The one rolled up in the bottom of the bug net has my hiking shoes in the middle. I thought if a big rain came it would keep them dry. I could hang them from the ridge line, but that would be too much trouble. Before turning in, it would all be tidied up.

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The rest of my system consists of a Nature Hike down sleeping bag. It is around a 40 degree bag. Overkill for the night, but it was a lighter option than my Nemo 22 degree. I also do not have an underquilt yet. It’s next on my list. I use a Big Agnes Air Core Inflatable Sleeping Pad. It is very comfortable and keeps my backside nice and warm so I do not suffer from frozen butt syndrome. There is also a pillow that I HATE. I have yet to find a good camping pillow. I have used inflatable and the ones that are filled with some squishy something. ALL are too small and just irritating.

Dinner was the run of the mill Mountain House Chicken and Dumplings. It was pretty good. I honestly wasn’t all that hungry. I had been while setting up, but the hunger passed the longer I waited. I didn’t even eat half of it.

I would have slept if it had not been so blasted hot and muggy. The air, literally, just sat  there, even with some pretty wild thunder and lightening. I finally dozed off around 3 am just out of shear exhaustion.

I woke up around 6. Heated up some oatmeal that was some fancy steel-cut oats with seeds. I hated it. It tasted like I was eating birdseed. I opted for a breakfast bar while I was tearing down. By 7 I was packed up and ready to go. on the way out I decided to just go ahead and finish up the loop, rather than go back the way I came. I did the 4 mile trek back to the parking lot. I had hoped to have a reprieve from the humidity by leaving early. No such luck. It was just as bad at 7 am as it was at 7 pm.

The part of the trail that I took out is called Big Creek Rim trail (BCR). It skirts along the rim and in and out of the woods. It was a beautiful hike out.

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And, of course, my phone battery went dead not long after this picture was taken.

I survived my first solo camping trip. No bears or bigfoot were seen and there were no serial killers in the vicinity. Now I feel like I can do more. The fear of going solo has been the thing that has kept me from many camping trips. No more. I will always push myself to do what is uncomfortable or even downright scary, for as long as I can at least.

A Savage Rescue

Tennessee Hikes, Waterfalls

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Hiking the Collins Gulf West Trail in Savage Gulf

The start of the hike was on a cool March morning. The time change had not happened yet so our hike would need to be paced so we could get out before dark. Six miles are all it was supposed to be. There would be waterfalls and spring flowers and a beautiful valley to hike through…and one whopper of a big hill to get up. I felt confident that the six miles would be completed way before sundown.

I was wrong.

First mistake.

Not checking the park website to verify the information I had gotten from a hiking website.  You see, a lot of the hiking websites have information uploaded by regular ol’ people.

Sometimes people get the information wrong.

Sometimes that wrong information can put someone in dire straits.

ALWAYS check the official website for park info.

I had been to this trail the year before to check out a waterfall and a bridge. On that hike, I first went to the waterfall and then double backed to go over to the bridge. The way that leads to the bridge has a long boulder field with small rocks and took forever to get through. You will need to know that for later in the story.

Lisa and I got to the trailhead and I had fixed up one of my extra day packs for her so she would have a full bladder of water.  I didn’t think the hike was long, but I did know it was going to have some difficult areas and that she would need water. She had brought her own backpack and two bottles of water. She turned down my offer of the bladder, insisting that she had plenty. At this point, I didn’t know what to do. I knew two bottles would not be enough, but I don’t like to tell adults what to do. So, I said, ‘ok, have it your way’.  Worst case, I could always share my water with her. I had 3 liters and I never actually drink that much. I put the pack back in the car and we started down the trail.

About a half mile into the trail she stopped and bent down to tie her shoe. When she did the water bottle she had in her backpack pocket leaked out all over the ground. She looked at me with an ‘oh, crap’ look and also a look of ‘please don’t say I told you so.’  I told her I had plenty and not to worry about it. I filled her bottle up with some of mine and off we went.

We got to Suter Falls in no time at all. Suter is gorgeous. There is a narrow path that leads down to a metal bridge that is in front of the falls. We stayed there for a long time taking pictures. It’s just one of those spots you can’t hike on through. You HAVE to stop and take it all in.

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Once we were through there we hiked on and started down into the valley. Everything was fine. The sun had really warmed us up and it was a beautiful day.  On the way down to the valley we met a group of four hikers.  They were on their way to a campsite. We talked for a few minutes and they went on past us.

Next stop was Horsepound falls. This was a smaller falls, but was pretty just the same. Here I decided to lose the thermals I had on. And Lisa, a yoga instructor, wanted me to get pics of her being silly with some yoga poses.  I took all the pics of her with her camera. We stayed there for quite awhile taking pics just like we had done earlier at Suter. Again, we took too much time doing that. We would pay for that in just a few hours.

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We left Horsepound and walked in the valley along a beautiful creek. We stopped over and over to take pictures not realizing we had been lollygaging a bit too much.

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We strolled along and before we knew it we had caught up with the family that passed us earlier. They had already set up their camp. We spoke as we walked on by and as we passed, the man asked if we had a flashlight.  Flashlight? Darn it. I usually carry one but I didn’t think I did this time. He ran over and gave me a tiny little light and said ‘you’re going to need this.’ Huh? Really? I said ok and thank you and we went on our way.  Soon we were hiking up Stagecoach Road (which is a dirt trail). This is a very steep section of the trail that will lead you back into the woods at the top. It was while we were hiking up this section that one of Lisa’s knees began to hurt. It’s also when I realized the trail was not six miles long but twelve.

Two young men passed us on the way up Stagecoach and spoke for a minute and then went on. It flattened out at the top but Lisa’s knee was really starting to bother her. I didn’t say it outloud, but I was thinking ‘Doesn’t matter. We have GOT to get moving to get out before dark.’ I am going to say that at this point it was probably around 4 or so. We went on into the woods  crossing over several little creeks. This section was so pretty but we couldn’t stop to enjoy it. We were on a mission. I realized about thrity minutes or so on this section that Lisa was moving even slower. She said her other knee was now hurting. We were moving incredibly slow. Like .3 miles an hour slow and the sun was setting quickly. All we had for light was our cell phones and the little flashlight the man had given me. The flashlight was no longer than my index finger and I was praying that it had a fresh battery.

I turned around to watch the sun setting behind Lisa.

There we were in the Savage Gulf in the pitch black with the tiniest flashlight I have ever seen to get us out.

Complete Silence.

I wasn’t sure how long she would be able to go. I told her that I knew if we got to the big bridge that we would be about a mile from the car. Remember, I had been there the year before. What I didn’t tell her was that past the bridge was the boulder field. Also, what I think is the hardest part of the trail.

We would walk a few feet and stop. Over and Over again. The weird thing was I wasn’t scared. Worried for her, yes. I wasn’t thinking of bears or bobcats or bigfoot. I was just thinking that we had to hurry up. Temperatures were beginning to drop as well. She had worn a light jacket. I had not.

I would run ahead and see if I could find the bridge and run back. Over and over nothing.  Finally, after a couple of hours of barely making any progress she told me she could not go any further.  She was done. We were next to a large boulder that had space in the middle of it. She suggested that we just hunker down and stay there for the night.  I knew that wasn’t going to be possible. I was freezing. We had to get out of there.

Off and on we had cell service. I took our phones, leaving her by the boulder and ran back up the hill we had just come down. I was able to get service. I finally got through to her husband who was none too happy with the situation. I asked him to call the rangers station and gave him the info on where I thought we were.  I told him we were not lost, but that her knees had just locked up. I hung up with him and finally got my husband and told him to do the same. After I hung up I heard Lisa calling my name and I ran back down to her. And there, standing with her, was a lady ranger. She said, ‘We’ve been looking for you two.’

Because we had not returned to our car they checked the hiker registry and they ran a check on my tags. Also, the two men that had been on the stagecoach part of the trail with us were camping at the first campsites nearest the parking lot. When it had gotten late and they had not seen us they called the rangers. They were looking for us long before our husbands had called.

It ain’t over yet.

The ranger called back to a couple of guy rangers that were on their way in as well. She told them that Lisa was not able to walk and would need assistance.  The ranger said that the big bridge I had been looking for was literally right there and that Lisa was going to have to try and walk herself across it. With her help we got her over the bridge. I knew now we weren’t that far from the parking lot, but, as I stated before, I also knew she could not do the next section. We sat down and waited for the men to arrive. Lisa told the ranger that she felt like it was her IT bands on her legs that were the problem and that they were really hurting. The men arrived and one got on either side of her. They would lift her legs and walk a few feet over the boulders and then put her down to rest. They did this several times when they finally called it. They said there was no way just the two of them could do it and would have to call for rescue.

It’s about nine o’clock.

It was cold.

They called in for rescue. While we were sitting there I told them that I was going to go ahead and try to get back to the car. I was freezing and had no jacket. Lisa did have one and I felt like she was in good hands.  She agreed and was ok with my living her and trying to get back to the car. One of the rangers gave me his headlamp and off I went.

In the dark.

By myself.

It felt like it was taking forever. At this point I had been hiking for over 12 hours. The adrenaline was finally wearing off and I was now feeling my own leg pain and exhaustion. I would walk 10 minutes and stop to rest. It was eerie. It was so quiet. I saw not a single animal. Just complete stillness.

After several minutes, maybe even an hour or so, I saw some headlamps coming towards me. Not just one or two but, about 24. And just like that they got to me and asked how far she was and I couldn’t even try to calculate it. I said the usual hiker answer “mile, mile and a half’. I know. Bad. It felt like ten since I had left her and I honestly had no idea how far. The trail of eager young men who seemed to live for this sort of thing zoomed on past me with a contraption called the wheel. It is basically a gurney with one wheel on the bottom of it in the middle.

 

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Once again, I was in the dark and alone.

I finally made it through the rocky area and back on regular trail. I could hear Suter falls rolling down the path that I passed to go back to the car. I sat down to rest. My legs were starting to really hurt. I needed to rest but rest made it worse when I would get up to walk. I pressed on and finally made it back to the car.

There was a fire truck there. Oh , yay. I am just glad there were no news crews. A fireman that was up there handed me some water. I got in my car, turned it on, cranked up the heat, laid the seat back and TRIED to get some sleep. I was going to have an almost three-hour drive home and I knew I couldn’t do that without some type of nap.

I think a couple more hours passed when I heard a commotion outside that woke me up. There was a pickup truck that had Lisa in the back strapped down to the wheel. Apparently they had backed the truck down the trail as far as they could go.

I jumped out and ran over. The men got her out of the truck and carried her over to the car and gently put her in her seat.

The ordeal was over.

I felt horrible. I could not believe that I had completely, foolishly  went by what a hiking website said.

This was a very hard lesson learned. I am thankful for all the help we had along the way. From the man with the flashlight, to the guys hiking up the trail with us, to all the rangers that were looking for us and for the volunteer rescue team that came out.  It was amazing to see how it all came together. Of course, it took a couple of days to ‘see’ it all. This could have turned out so much worse.

Twenty-four hours after I left my house to go on the hike I walked back through my front door and fell on the bed and slept for hours.

The next morning I contacted the owners of the website ( a VERY well known website) and told them what happened and that they needed to update the mileage for the trail. Within fifteen minutes it was updated.

 

Be Safe and remember to always check the park websites for info!

 

 

 

 

Ice Hiking Greeter and Foster Falls

Tennessee Hikes

The crazy low temperatures we have had for the last several days have made for some spectacular Instagram posts for frozen waterfalls and icicles.  And, as I am prone to do, I waited until the very last day that low temperatures were forecasted to go out and find me some frozen water.

I gathered together my closest hiking buddies (for the record, I have the BEST group of gals to hike with) and the four of us headed off into the cold, dreary Saturday morning in search of beauty and fellowship. We found it.

I have to admit I was taken aback by the number of cars that were in Greeter Falls parking lot when we pulled in. I mean, who is crazy enough to get out early with degrees in the teens and go hiking? Oh, wait!!! Nevermind.  I had really hoped that the hoopla was done and that I was the last person to decide to venture out and do this. I was so very wrong.  It was packed.  Packed with lots of people with cameras and equipment far better than mine. I suffer from LE aka. lens envy. I look at everyone else and figure why should I bother.

But I still do…..

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Not sure how I captured a pink sun flare. I did not add that in post.

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We stopped at Upper Greeter Falls first and were blown away.

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After seeing this we couldn’t wait to get down to the lower falls. The spiral staircase was clear of almost all ice. There was a huge frozen ice mass right next to them.

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Down the spiral and then down the long staircase to the base. It was ALL clear.

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treesccThere was even a husky running around. He was thrilled with the cold temperatures. His tag reads ‘Winter’. How cool is that?

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After Greeter we trekked on over to Foster Falls. I have to admit Foster is my favorite waterfall. However, my picutres did not do it justice. Unlike Greeter it was actually flowing quite well. I had accidentally left my neutral density filters at home ( I know, made me sick too). I was not able to catch the soft flowing water without them.

The hike down to Foster is very steep. It is not a long hike at all, just very, very steep. There is a little cave house right at the beginning of the descend and the ice was absolutely beautiful.

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Foster was creating a bowl at the base where the water had frozen when it splashed up.

It really was something to see.

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A little further up on the rock climbers trail there was a huge, frozen fall on the rock face. It was stunning.

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And, just like that, it was time to head back up the hill.

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Did I mention it was steep?

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And now, for the important part. I want to give a shout out to this awesome restaurant.

The post-hike meal. I mean, that IS why we hike isn’t it?

Whenever, and I mean with.out.fail, I am in the Savage Gulf area we stop and eat at Jim Oliver’s Smokehouse. I would describe it as Cracker Barrel’s redneck cousin. Their food is the best. I always get the bbq. They have a buffet as well that usually sports a gigantic iron skillet with bread budding. They have bbq sauce called “Blazin’ Rectum” and also have coffee and peach flavored sauces. You HAVE to stop there.  insert blurry iphone pic.

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That’s it!

Happy Hiking!